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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
't control everything. we invest in stocks of individual companies. in an uncertain environment, few things are better than a company with an honest to goodness turnaround story. one that's not dependent on the doings of congress or the president. take mgm resorts international. mgm for you home gamers, a stock i have not talked about in ages but i think it's time to step up to the plate. largest casino operator in vegas. vegas is hard hit. they have a sizable business in china. center project in vegas that this company was practically -- you couldn't write it off. burdened with vast amounts of debt and then a new ceo came in. he slowly but surely has been fixing mgm's past mistakes including the massive citi center project in vegas that drove the company to the brink of chapter 11. this is a turn that's been years in making but now businesses are starting to come back. you haven't missed anything so this is the moment. let me explain. not long ago it was a real sick customer. took on a ton the debt when las vegas was fabulous place to do business. when the vegas market got annihilate durin
in today's environment. whether it is pared back as a matter for legislators and the one making process to look at, but clearly the copyright itself should be maintained. whether it should be maintained exactly in this framework is an open question. >> access -- >> where do you stand on this? spending money on the book. [talking over each other] >> a lot of books -- [talking over each other] >> there are materials that are locked up, the orphan works or things that libraries all over the world find, and that is why we are very hopeful that the digital public library of america will help with the digitization of materials and also the projects that are going on so that you can unleash these things. we would love to think about it, and millions and millions, also think about the digitization that is going to take. >> that -- [talking over each other] >> they have a lousy deal on the publishing side. but still in process. >> they will be here on tuesday probably discussing these things. still fighting google, there is an appeal. the next panel -- [talking over each other] >> from the libra
in an environment, at least i was fortunate enough, where we believed it was effective. you know it's very -- pretty much acceptable or maybe in vogue somewhat today to be so critical or almost invariably critical of the country and pointing out what is wrong. there are obviously things wrong. there are obviously things wrong when i grew up in georgia, and that was pointed out. but there was always an underlying belief that we were entitled to be a full participant in we the people. that is the way we grew up. it was the way the nuns who were all immigrants would explain it to us, that we were entitled as citizens of this country to be full participants. there was never any doubt that we were inherently equal and it said so in the declaration of independence. of course there were times later on bad i too became quite critical and would make glib remarks in deciding the not so pleasant and reciting the pledge of allegiance or sing things that i thought were -- [inaudible] people can youtube and it's around forever. i grew up in an environment where the people around me believed that this country coul
it wasn't perfect. that's an understatement. but you grow up in an environment, at least i was fortunate enough, where we believed it was effective. you know it's very -- pretty much acceptable or maybe in vogue somewhat today to be so critical or almost invariably critical of the country and pointing out what is wrong. there are obviously things wrong. there are obviously things wrong when i grew up in georgia, and that was pointed out. but there was always an underlying belief that we were entitled to be a full participant in we the people. that is the way we grew up. it was the way the nuns who were all immigrants would explain it to us, that we were entitled as citizens of this country to be full participants. there was never any doubt that we were inherently equal and it said so in the declaration of independence. of course there were times later on bad i too became quite critical and would make glib remarks in deciding the not so pleasant and reciting the pledge of allegiance or sing things that i thought were -- [inaudible] people can youtube and it's around forever. i grew up in
an environment there was spirit and was spun by the development of late george w. norris who came to nebraska and fought for the unicameral legislature and nonpartisan. some people say he did it because he wanted to save money. i am sure it saves money to have one house, but the main reason he did it is to get rid of the conference committees that we go through the back here that are a puzzle. i was at a conference committee on the football field and bate changes five times before they blow the whistle. so what we have in nebraska is something that is officially nonpartisan and looks nonpartisan, so that is a backdrop for me. so when i come here in a partisan environment, i said i don't have to subscribe to partisan environment. mauney goal and my team as the governor is to run nebraska, not republican or democratic or east or west urban, i represent all the people even those that voted against me. i've taken that approach back here to represent all the people, not just other people. >> did you ever think about becoming an independent? >> the democratic party never pushed it out to greet you
at an environment that is as bullish for the broad american public as it might seem, looking at the stock market. >> dan, one of the, kind of a side follow, there have been 312 stimulative easings of one policy stimulus and central bank easings over the last 16 months over the world. that's extraordinary. 312. so one's answer to this question may be that there's an awful lot of money sloshing around from central banks around the world who are saying, look, we've got to drive this company and they're opening the spigots. >> they are, but the question, what is happening to that capital. is it deployed for productive uses? i think in the case of the united states we've seen what's been written about is that many companies have spent hundreds of billions of dollars buying back their own stock. they've been borrowing this money cheaply and using it to buy back their own stock, rather than investing in productive capital projects and there's a cool of thought that says most of the growth in the stock market has been because companies have been net buyers of stock, whereas retail investors and the mutu
to lay better eggs in this environment? >> no, but you'll be encouraged and inspired. >> reporter: fancy chickens do lay colored eggs, green and red. i tried one. it's really good. really good. i would definitely pay $100,000 for that egg. dan harris, abc news, new york. >> give it some gas, dan. >> the jet pack looks cool. the hen house, come on, now. every day. that looks like a good gift because that's something if you have that kind of money you can get into, you know what i mean? >> until you crash it. >> i don't have that kind of money. merry christmas, everybody. >>> this morning on "world news now," trouble times two. the west coast gets slammed again by powerful storms at the worst of times. >>> and with the tremendous snowfall and powerful wind swept rain, mother nature is not spending christmas and other parts of the country christmas cheer. it's monday, december 4. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> and good monday morning, on this christmas eve. good to have brandy back in the house. it's been good. we had a little eggnog. >> we're making it a festive holiday. >
in case they want to find a low security environment in which to go and steal weapons. new york has a problem with terrorist cells. so we also know which houses don't have guns. this is a severe danger to the community that this newspaper has brought about. >> gretchen: like i'm thinking, let's say now that somebody goes to rob one of these homes that they know they don't have guns, let's say something horrible happens, do those homeowners then have a lawsuit against the newspaper? >> you know, i don't necessarily think so. but i do think it would be smart for the homeowners and the gun owners to give notice to the newspaper that they fear for their security and their safety, that of their families and they would ask their -- the names and addresses be unpublished for purposes of safety. that's the minimum they can do at this point and ask for a written response from the newspaper. >> gretchen: very interesting. let's read the statement. this is from the journal news, the newspaper. the massacre in newtown, connecticut remains top of mind for many of our readers. our readers are und
that and answers that question. we need government but we need government to create a stable environment for businesses to function and to create jobs. when government metals too much into the economy, government and its decisions and policies are driven by politics, and markets are driven by the desire of individuals and companies to meet the need that the real world needs people. that's the difference in what government does and what markets do. so you need government to create, to protect us from fraud, from wrongdoers. there are wrongdoers and government can protect us from them, but overly meddlesome government will, it goes too far and you end up depressing enterprise and innovation and job creation. >> the 2008 financial situation and the so-called bailout, are you supportive of that government intervention? >> we raise and answer the question in that book. you could see that as sort of, you know, emergency intervention. if the government had done it and got now that would've been fine but, unfortunately, they stayed too long. i think the comparison we make is to katrina. there's
that says you're a person do too. you know you deeply moving. it was in this environment the ronald reagan went to sea pack and said we need bold colors no pale pastel. he was throwing down a battle sign. he was saying don't tell me you have a sellout. don't tell me you have a cave. don't tell me you have do whatever the left wants. there are moments in history where you draw a line and fight. we have thirty governors. we a huge number of state legislators. the idea we are supposed to create a center caucus in order to be socially acceptable in washington is absurd. that's what people are currently forming in washington. how much do i need to surrender so he won't beat me anymore? when i was family elected to congress, it turns out of my bad scheduling with the second time i ran jimmy carter was head of the democratic ticket. it was the best campaign technical ily i ever ran. it felt good toward the end. everything feels right because you're the candidate in the middle of the mess. i went in to vote on election day 1973 and the state of georgia was and i found myself standing in line. behi
who's been trained for sensitive environments that can provide the protection, an added level of security and other security measures, not just that. let the teachers teach and let others protect. >> i think that some people would agree with the idea of having armed security guards in the school if the community wanted it, but they would also say at the same time we have to have some commonsense restrictions on guns. you shouldn't have high-capacity magazines that can shoot 30 bullets. senator manchin said background checks for those who buy them at gun shows, not just from registered dealers. what's wrong with those? >> i think it takes away -- it -- whenever you pass those kind of laws, you think, well, we've done something. we've somehow made our children more safe, so you go home. i don't think the job is really accomplishing anything if you take that approach. >> but why not do both? >> because the children will still be unsafe. >> why not do what you're recommending and have gun control? >> well, i don't think that's the solution. congress can debate that. i will focus m
to lay better eggs in this environment? >> no, but you as the farmer will be encouraged and inspired. >> reporter: fancy chickens do lay colored eggs, green and red. i tried one. it's really good. really good. i would definitely pay $100,000 for that egg. dan harris, abc news, new york. >> give it some gas, dan. give it some gas. >> the jet pack looks cool. we can all agree on that. the hen house, come on, now. that's how i get home from work every day. just float down central park west and i'm back home just like that. that looks like a good gift because that's something if you have that kind of money you can get into, you know what i mean? >> until you crash it. >> i don't have that kind of money. merry christmas, everybody. don't have that kind of money. merry christmas, everybody.
in that environment is to have it both ways. my view is there is too much classified information. my view is there is too much secrecy in general, and we should probably we think a lot of how we do it. i am inclined to want to see diplomats like susan rice to be as candid as possible with the public. there is another view on that, that we spell too many secrets. -- spill too many secrets. host: this goes back to the 9/11 commission and how intelligence is shared amongst agencies. guest: to me, it is one of these fascinating things that always comes up. whenever there is a catastrophe like 9/11 or the u.s.s. cole, everybody always says they did not share the information. one part of the government had one piece and they did not connect the dots. in the intelligence business, you're getting information from very technical sources or wiretaps or satellites that we do not want other people to know about. people in the business want to usually keep the stuff they collect in as small a group responsible in order to avoid the other big problem of moles and so forth. if you look at wikileaks, thi
the question of canada to be cut? is it politically possible in this environment to get enough republicans and democrats to support a deal that the white house wants on deficit reduction? because they been to the altar so many times on this same issue, taxes, medicare, social security, defense spending, you must wonder, if there's any agreement possible. host: first, commented today from the senate republican leader mitch mcconnell, who will join his colleagues later today at the white house. [video clip] >> i told the president last night we would be happy to look at whatever he proposes. the truth is we are coming up against a hard deadline. as i said, this is a conversation we should have had months ago. republicans are not about to write a blank check or anything senate democrats before or just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that would not be fair to the american people. that said, we will see what the president has to propose. members on both sides will review it. then we will decide how best to proceed. hopefully, there's still time for an agreement of some kind
businesses and private money and investment in private investment and the environment. >> i've been doing this almost 23 years we need certainty. we want to invest our money, but we want to know the rules aren't going to challenge. if carbon's the bag thing, that i'm not going to be disadvantaged if i'm clean. don't put me on a player field that's harder for me to compete. >> what's your plan for the second term? are you sticking around? >> what i can say is i'm very limited. we have so much work to do. >> in a statement president obama says jackson has shown an unwavering commitment to the health of our families and our children. >>> so russia may soon ban adoptions by americans. many are opposing the ban including this young whom tells me her own inspire i story about her adoption. ♪ you are my sunshine, my only sunshine ♪ ♪ you make me happy when skies are gray ♪ [ female announcer ] you know exactly what it takes to make them feel better. ♪ you make me happy [ female announcer ] that's why you choose children's tylenol. the same brand your mom trusted for you when you were y
environment. host: an editorial responding to and preparing for natural disasters is one of government's most important functions. it's as lawmakers should provide immediate relief without having to worry about demanding that spending to cut elsewhere. jan in springfield, mass., on the line for democrats. caller: 5 would like to say in florida in 2004 when they had all of the hurricanes, state farm insurance pulled out of the state and refused to ensure homes. people that have car insurance with state farm wanted to cancel their insurance. we found out the weight state farm is judging each state -- we found out state farm is judging each state. there are states where they are not making a profit so they are not insuring. global warming and new storms, the insurance companies need to look at their policies and unite them as americans. please quit referring to us as "ordinary" and referred to us as the backbone of the nation. guest: i was born in massachusetts, so i certainly feel you are part of the backbone of the nation. there is not reformed insurance policy coverage in this bill. a big pro
and veterans and defender of our environment. senator schatz will be a strong, progressive voice for hawaii in the united states senate. he will represent freedom and equality. he will be a strong voice on climate change, expanding clean, renewable energy and protecting our precious natural resources. he will defend our native hawaiians and all of our nation's first people, those americans who exercise sovereignty in lands that later became part of the united states. he will uphold the values and priorities of our unique state. i say to my friend, the new junior senator from hawaii, never forget that you are here with a solemn responsibility to do everything you can to represent the people of hawaii, to make sure that their needs are addressed in every policy discussion, to speak up and seek justice for those who cannot help themselves. god bless you, senator schatz. god bless hawaii. god bless the united states of america. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from nevada. mr. reid: before my friend from hawaii leaves the floor, we have all come and given speeches --
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)